Ig Nobel Prize winner Harold Camping achieves his doom

Ig Nobel Prize winner Harold Camping is dead. Camping shared the 2011 Ig Nobel Prize for mathematics. That prize was awarded to

Dorothy Martin of the USA (who predicted the world would end in 1954), Pat Robertson of the USA (who predicted the world would end in 1982), Elizabeth Clare Prophet of the USA (who predicted the world would end in 1990), Lee Jang Rim of KOREA (who predicted the world would end in 1992), Credonia Mwerinde of UGANDA (who predicted the world would end in 1999), and Harold Camping of the USA (who predicted the world would end on September 6, 1994 and later predicted that the world will end on October 21, 2011), for teaching the world to be careful when making mathematical assumptions and calculations.

Today USA Today and the Associated Press report:

Doomsday minister Harold Camping dead at 92 

OAKLAND, California (AP) — Harold Camping, the U.S. preacher who used his evangelical radio ministry and thousands of billboards to broadcast the end of the world and then gave up public prophecy when his date-specific doomsdays did not come to pass, has died at age 92.

Camping, a retired civil engineer who built a worldwide following for the nonprofit Oakland, California-based ministry he founded in 1958, died at his home Sunday, said Family Radio Network marketing manager Nina Romero….  Camping’s most widely spread prediction was that the Rapture would happen on May 21, 2011. His independent Christian media empire spent millions of dollars — some of it from donations made by followers who quit their jobs and sold all their possessions— to spread the word on more than 5,000 billboards and 20 RVs plastered with the Judgment Day message. When the Judgment Day he foresaw did not materialize, the preacher revised his prophecy, saying he had been off by five months…

STATUS REPORT (SUMMARY): Mr. Camping is not still not dead. At least one of his co-winners, Pat Robertson, is still not dead.

HISTORICAL BONUS: How Harold does his math

HISTORICAL BONUS: Harold Camping, Ig Nobel Prize-winning mathematician, explains his mistake

BONUS: Two interviews with Mr. Camping in 2011, shortly after the world did not end again: