Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Part 9 of 10)

HotAIR LOGO

Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Part 9 of 10)

A glance at the colorful research of an under-publicized scientist

by Alice Shirrell Kaswell, with research assistance from Rachael Moeller Gorman

This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.


Heavy Going, With Integrity and Gloves

After the glitter of the baseball-type-cap years, Trinkaus concentrated on what some might consider heavy going -- a renewed, concentrated examination of stop sign compliance and a first look at left-turning traffic, as well as side-explorations of the use of the word “integrity,” of behavior concerning bakery department tongs and tissues, and of certain aspects of the concept of disappearing gloves.

The first publication of this period was Trinkaus’s first -- and to date only -- “Final Look” paper.

* * *

(72) “Stop Sign Compliance: A Final Look,” J. Trinkhaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 85, no 1, August 1997, p. 217.

(73) “Conversational Usage of ‘Integrity’: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 86, no. 2, April 1998, pp. 585-6.

Investigated the use of the noun ”integrity” in social conversation. A counting of its employment during 67 half-hr television talk shows showed 7 instances. The author concludes that the use of the word is fading.

(74) “Compliance With a School Zone Limit: Another Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 87, no. 2, October 1998, pp. 673-4.

Replication of a study (J. Trinkaus, 1996) conducted three years earlier as to the rate of drivers’ compliance with the posted speed limit of a school zone showed a decline from about 11% to 8%.

(75) “An Informal Look at Left-Turning Traffic,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 87, no. 2, October 1998, pp. 701-2.

(76) “An Informal Look at Use of Bakery Department Tongs and Tissues,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 87, no. 3, part 1, December 1998, pp. 801-2.

Of 108 people observed extracting for purchase rolls or pastries from displayed bulk stock in food supermarket bakery departments, about 90% used their hands for item selection and withdrawal rather than the store provided tongs. In stores where tissues were provided instead of tongs, approximately 60% of the 133 people who were observed used their hands.

(77) “School Zone Limit Dissenters: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 88, no. 1, part 1, June 1999, p. 1056.

(78) “Gloves as Vanishing Personal ‘Stuff’: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 84, no. 3, part 2, June 1999, p. 1187.

Presents an informal discussion on the mystery of vanishing personal ‘stuff’ such as gloves. Definition of ‘personal stuff’ and its distinct categories; Author’s analysis on disappearing gloves.

* * *


This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.

© Copyright 2003 Annals of Improbable Research (AIR)

This is a HotAIR feature. For a complete list of features, see What's New.