Archive for 'Improbable investigators'

The past and further adventures of Troy Hurtubise (of grizzly fame) (Part 2 of 3)

Monday, January 6th, 2014

Ig Nobel Prize winner Troy Hurtubise explains in exquisite detail why and how he has spent 25 years building and testing a suit of armor to protect himself against grizzly bears. Vice presents a three-part interview with Troy. Yesterday we enjoyed part 1.

Here’s part 2, about how Troy has been adapting his anti-grizzly-bear technology to protect military personnel:

 

BONUS (from 2011): Troy’s New Book of Bear (and then some) Adventures

The past and further adventures of Troy Hurtubise (of grizzly) (Part 1 of 3)

Sunday, January 5th, 2014

Ig Nobel Prize winner Troy Hurtubise explains in exquisite detail why and how he has spent 25 years building and testing a suit of armor to protect himself against grizzly bears. Vice presents a three-part interview with Troy.

Here’s part 1, about his grizzly bear work:

 

BONUS (from 2001): When Troy Met a Kodiak Bear

BONUS: Troy demonstrates that he, like a bear, can eat ants:

BONUS: Old, unreal ants you can’t eat

BONUS: The scientist who ate 100 ants, repeatedly

PS. Yes—and sorry!—there is a typo in the headline of this blog item. It should say “…of grizzly fame”

It’s all about the brand: Surgeon accused of branding his initials into a patient’s liver

Thursday, January 2nd, 2014

bramhallNews reports  say that Simon Bramhall [pictured here], Consultant HPB & Liver Transplant Surgeon in Birmingham, is accused of branding his initials into a transplant patient’s liver. The Telegraph‘s report, by Miranda Prynne, begins:

A surgeon has been suspended after allegedly branding his initials into a transplant patient’s liver. Consultant Simon Bramhall, 48, is accused of burning ‘SB’ onto a patient’s liver as he operated on him. The letters were spotted by a colleague during routine surgery on the unnamed patient. It is now feared the letters may have been imprinted onto hundreds of other transplant recipients….

Dr. Bramhall is a man of letters. His extensive CV lists numerous medical publications, including these:

Use of Marginal Donors.
Garcia CE, Bramhall S, Mirza DF.
Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation 2000;5:50-56.

Management of liver trauma.
Bramhall SR, Buckels J.
British Journal of Surgery 2000;87(4):517-518.

Abdominal wall burns; a late complication of liver transplant.
Singhal A, Bramhall SR, Mutimer D.
Liver Transplantation 2008;14(7):1065-1066.

(Thanks to investigator Scott Langill for bringing this to our attention.)

BONUS: Dr. Bramhill also wrote the colorfully titled:

Purse-string pancreaticojejunostomy following pancreatic resection.
Williams JG, Bramhall SR, Neoptolemos JP.
Digestive Surgery 1997;14:183-186.

BONUS (possibly unrelated):

Branding of Vascular Surgery,” Bruce A. Perler, Perspectives in vascular surgery and endovascular therapy 20, no. 1 (2008): 6-8.

Professor Loving’s Research about Loving

Thursday, December 26th, 2013

Professor Timothy J. Loving of Purdue University specializes in research about loving. His web site explains:

Biography

lovingDr. Loving is primarily interested in the relationship support process. Specifically, he investigates the reasons for, and consequences of, romantically involved individuals’ conversations with their social network members about the romantic relationship.

One of his fairly recent studies is:

I do…do you? Dependence and biological sex moderate daters’ cortisol responses when accommodating a partner’s thoughts about marriage,” Elizabeth A. Schoenfeld, Timothy J. Loving, International Journal of Psychophysiology, epub July 15, 2012. (Thanks to Neil Martin for bringing this to our attention.) The authors explain:

“We examined how daters’ levels of relationship dependence interact with men’s and women’s degree of accommodation during a likelihood of marriage discussion to predict cortisol levels at the conclusion of the discussion. Upon arriving at the laboratory, couple members were separated and asked to graph their perceived likelihood of one day marrying each other. Couples were reunited and instructed to create a joint graph depicting their agreed-upon chance of marriage. For the majority of couples, negotiating their likelihood of marriage required one or both partners to accommodate each other’s presumed likelihood of marriage. Multilevel analyses revealed a significant Dependence × Accommodation × Sex interaction. For women who increased their likelihood of marriage, feelings of dependence predicted heightened levels of cortisol relative to baseline; we suggest such a response is indicative of eustress. Among men, those who accommodated by decreasing their likelihood of marriage experienced significantly lower levels of cortisol to the extent that they were less dependent on their partners.”

BONUS (unrelated): Trickey and Hyde on the dark side

Trickey and Hyde team up for the dark side

Tuesday, December 24th, 2013

Trickey [pictured below] and Hyde [pictured below Trickey] have teamed up to explore the dark side. They produced this study, bolstering their not inconsiderable powers by enlisting the super-prolific Adrian Furnham as a co-author:

Do your Dark Side Traits Fit? Dysfunctional Personalities in Different Work Sectors,” Adrian Furnham, Gillian Hyde, Geoff Trickey, Applied Psychology, epub December 2012.

trickey

 

hyde

 

BONUS: Furnham’s buttock and breast ogling

BONUS: Super-prolific professors team up

BONUS: Professor Furnham invites you to breakfast: