Archive for 'Improbable Sex'

Boys Will Be Boys: Eat or Be Eaten, and a Pestle

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

v22i4-250wWhat’s the deal with people who yearn to eat or to be eaten — to literally consume, or to literally be consumed — during sex. And what’s a good example of an early medical report about a pestle found in a rectum?

Those questions are addressed in studies that are profiled (in the column “Boys Will Be Boys: Eat or Be Eaten, and a Pestle“) in the special kissing issue of the Annals of Improbable Research.

The vorarephilia study, about the eating and/or being eaten, was done by researchers at the University of New England and the University of Toronto.

Are There Societies Where Lovers Do Not Kiss?

Saturday, August 6th, 2016

v22i4-250wAre There Societies Where Lovers Do Not Kiss? Is any society devoid of osculation?

Those questions are addressed in a study that’s profiled in the special kissing issue of the Annals of Improbable Research.

4.5 million looks at a couple’s sex organs

Saturday, June 11th, 2016

The historic video of the video of MRI sex has gone past the 4.5 million (4,500,000) views mark on YouTube. Dr. Pek van Andel produced the MRI sex video as a spinoff from his historic, ultimately prize-winning experiment. The experiment asked and answered the question: Is it possible to take MRI images of a couple’s sexual organs while those organs are in use?

The Ig Nobel prize in medicine, in the year 2000, was awarded to Willibrord Weijmar SchultzPek van Andel, and Eduard Mooyaart of Groningen, The Netherlands, and Ida Sabelis of Amsterdam, for their report, “Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Male and Female Genitals During Coitus and Female Sexual Arousal.” [Published in British Medical Journal, vol. 319, 1999, pp 1596-1600.]

BONUS: Ida Sabelis, one of the people inside the MRI tube, later wrote about the experience. That account was published in the Annals of Improbable Research.

BONUS: Dutch filmmaker Bahram Sadeghi later made a short documentary about the people involved in the experiment. Here it is:

BONUS [July 3, 2012]: Investigator Tony Tweedale alerts us to the consequential connection between the above video and the one displayed, on the New Scientist web site, under the headline “Baby’s birth captured in MRI movie for the first time“:

Sixteen-legged Oral Sex

Sunday, May 1st, 2016

Sixteen legs, all told, are involved in the kind of one-on-one sexual activity celebrated in this new study:

Spider-sex

Matja_GregoricSpider behaviors include oral sexual encounters,” Matjaž Gregorič [pictured here, right], Klavdija Šuen, Ren-Chung Cheng, Simona Kralj-Fišer & Matjaž Kuntner, Scientific Reports, vol. 6, no. 25128, epub 2016. The authors, at Scientific Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts and the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, write:

“Here, we bring [report] on sexual behavior of Darwin’s bark spider, Caerostris darwini. This sexually size dimorphic Madagascan species is known for extreme web gigantism and for producing the world’s toughest biomaterial. Our field and laboratory study uncovers a rich sexual repertoire that predictably involves cannibalism, genital mutilation, male preference for teneral females, and emasculation. Surprisingly, C. darwini males engage in oral sexual encounters, rarely reported outside mammals. Irrespective of female’s age or mating status males salivate onto female genitalia pre-, during, and post-copulation.”

Daniel Oberhaus wrote an appreciative essay about this in Motherboard.

This adds to the list of species eagerly observed, by humans, to engage in oral sex. Among the very most celebrated: The 2010 Ig Nobel Prize for biology was awarded to Libiao Zhang, Min Tan, Guangjian Zhu, Jianping Ye, Tiyu Hong, Shanyi Zhou, and Shuyi Zhang of China, and Gareth Jones of the University of Bristol, UK, for scientifically documenting fellatio in fruit bats. Their report about that is; “Fellatio by Fruit Bats Prolongs Copulation Time,” Min Tan, Gareth Jones, Guangjian Zhu, Jianping Ye, Tiyu Hong, Shanyi Zhou, Shuyi Zhang and Libiao Zhang, PLoS ONE, vol. 4, no. 10, e7595. Here is video of that:

Ed Yong, a specialist in this line of research, published an appreciative essay in 2013 on that fruit bat paper and on a subsequent, related discovery: “You’ve Seen Fruit Bat Fellatio. Now: Fruit Bat Cunnilingus.”

 

The special HUMAN HEADS issue of the magazine is out!

Saturday, February 27th, 2016

The special HUMAN HEADS And GARLIC issue (vol. 22, no. 1) of the magazine (the Annals of Improbable Research) is now out! It’s bursting (as are all our issues) with carefully culled, improbable research snippets about everything, from anywhere, more or less.

This is the very first issue of our all-PDF era. We hope you enjoy it, and that you will spread the word to friends and colleagues! There are lots of new columns, and a new design (by the one and only Geri Sullivan) that’s easy to read on smartphones, as well as on larger screens.

If you are a subscriber, you should have received an email letting you know the new issue is available, with directions for downloading your copy.

If you are not yet a subscriber, you can purchase that issue from our Gumroad page.

Back issues of the magazine, and tables of contents, are available on the Improbable website.

 

AIR22-1-cover-450pix

Special thanks to Lauren Maurer Trew, our bookmaster, for working much of the tech magic that brought the magazine into this new era.