Microdosing oneself study – still time to participate

June 18th, 2019

If you’d like to participate in the Imperial College (London, UK) / Beckley Foundation (Oxford, UK) Naturalistic Self-Blinding [psychedelic] Microdose Study, there is still time – as it’s been extended to plant-based psychedelics (mushrooms &etc) as well. An important detail, participants should note that :

Also see : Founder and director of the Beckley Foundation, Amanda Feilding features in a 2001 Japan Times report regarding the benefits of drilling a hole in one’s skull.

[ research research by Martin Gardiner ]

Innovative Scientists Talk About Their Childhood (4): David Hu’s Sister Being Born

June 17th, 2019

Here’s David Hu talking about seeing the birth of his sister—an experience that, when he was a child, excited David in a way that led to his eventual unusual career. David uses math and physics—and experiments—to try to understand some of the seemingly simply, scientifically mystifying things that happen in nature every day.

ABOUT THIS LITTLE VIDEO SERIES—This is part of a series of sessions we (David Hu and I, and a film crew) recorded at Georgia Tech. We assembled a little group of scientists (including David) who are renowned for looking at questions others might overlook, and doing research in inventive, clever ways.

The question we asked them: “What happened when you were a kid that somehow led—much later—to your doing unusual science?

The scientists: David Hu, Suzana Herculano-Houzel, Frans de Waal, Nicole Sharp, Diego Golombek, and Olga Shishkov. Follow the links on their names to begin exploring some of their work!

A FURTHER NOTE ABOUT THIS SERIES: These little videos are not quite as good as they ought to have been, due to curious decisions made by the video editor. The most obvious of those strange decisions was to dose everything with goopy, slightly distracting music. The editor also objected to some of the content of the videos, deeming them somehow too offensive to record. The lesson we learned: choose our video editor more carefully.

This Person is About 98%

June 14th, 2019

“Although he has written books called What it Means to be 98% Chimpanzee and Why I am Not a Scientist, he would like it to be known, for the record, that he is about 98% scientist, and not a chimpanzee. ”

He is Jonathan Marks.

The Elephant in the Image [new study]

June 13th, 2019

Can state-of -the-art visual analysis software always be relied on to find the elephant in an image? Akshay Raj Dhamija and colleagues at the VAST lab (Vision And Security Technology) at the Department of Computer Science, at University of Colorado, at Colorado Springs, US. have recently investigated the robustness of automated elephant detector systems.

The team point out that whilst object detection research has a long history in computer vision (more than 50 years) it’s not always 100% accurate. Even using the latest versions of large-scale deep-learning neural-networks.

“While current state-of-the-art detectors are trained to handle backgrounds, their designs are not well equipped to address unknown objects, which are often incorrectly detected as the existing classes with a high confidence.”

[ note mis-identified elephants above ]

A recurring problem is that current systems still come across difficulties in deciding which regions in an image are ‘objects’ (of interest) and which are just insignificant backgrounds.

“Therefore, we consider it important that detection systems eventually learn to create a separation between background and unknown objects, enabling new objects to be identified. Currently, there is no such architecture and a design is left for the future work.”

See: Identifying the Elephant in Object Detection

Also see: (from the VAST lab) Detecting and Classifying Scars, Marks, and Tattoos Found in the Wild

[ research research by Martin Gardiner ]

Innovative Scientists Talk About Their Childhood (3): Olga Shishkov’s Bug Pals

June 12th, 2019

Here’s Olga Shishkov talking about some bugs that, when Olga was a child, excited Olga in a way that led to her eventual unusual career. Olga studies how maggots manage to do some of the surprising, impressive things they do.

ABOUT THIS LITTLE VIDEO SERIES—This is part of a series of sessions we (David Hu and I, and a film crew) recorded at Georgia Tech. We assembled a little group of scientists (including David) who are renowned for looking at questions others might overlook, and doing research in inventive, clever ways.

The question we asked them: “What happened when you were a kid that somehow led—much later—to your doing unusual science?

The scientists: David Hu, Suzana Herculano-Houzel, Frans de Waal, Nicole Sharp, Diego Golombek, and Olga Shishkov. Follow the links on their names to begin exploring some of their work!

A FURTHER NOTE ABOUT THIS SERIES: These little videos are not quite as good as they ought to have been, due to curious decisions made by the video editor. The most obvious of those strange decisions was to dose everything with goopy, slightly distracting music. The editor also objected to some of the content of the videos, deeming them somehow too offensive to record. The lesson we learned: choose our video editor more carefully.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!