Named-cow researcher recognizes merit in research on sheep recognizing people

“I was asked if, as an Ig Nobel laureate myself, I thought this recent Cambridge sheep study would be a contender for an Ig Nobel award, the prize for science that “first makes you laugh, then makes you think”. Celebrity-spotting sheep might sound funny but the science involved in this study actually isn’t sniggerable.” So writes Catherine Douglas of Newcastle University, in The Conversation.

Douglas’s essay has the headline “Sheep can recognise celebrities from photographs, says amusing study with serious potential.”

The 2009 Ig Nobel Prize for Veterinary Medicine was awarded to  Catherine Douglas and Peter Rowlinson of Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, UK, for showing that cows who have names give more milk than cows that are nameless.

That prize-winning research is documented in the study “Exploring Stock Managers’ Perceptions of the Human-Animal Relationship on Dairy Farms and an Association with Milk Production,” Catherine Bertenshaw [Douglas] and Peter Rowlinson, Anthrozoos, vol. 22, no. 1, March 2009, pp. 59-69

One Response to “Named-cow researcher recognizes merit in research on sheep recognizing people”

  1. Anthony C. Tweedale Says:

    Guardian UK:
    “• In studying the ability of sheep to recognise celebrities (Report, 8 November), did the researchers control for their participants’ prior exposure to ewe tube?”
    Peter Barnes Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire https://gu.com/p/7h8zf/sbl

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