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“Egg unboiling machine enables graphene battery development”

Egg unboiling machine enables graphene battery development,” is the headline in Mining Weekly. The article itself says:

The Australian researchers who successfully unboiled an egg are turning their attention to capturing the energy of graphene oxide to make a more efficient alternative to lithium-ion batteries.

The Flinders University team in South Australia has partnered with Swinburne University of Technology in Victoria, ASX-listed First Graphene and manufacturer Kremford….

In 2015, Flinders University scientists were awarded an Ig Nobel Award for creating the Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) and using it to unboil an egg. The device has also been used to accurately slice carbon nanotubes to an average length of 170 nanometres using only water, a solvent and a laser. It has also been used to process graphene to a high quality for commercial use.

The basic egg-unboiling technology is being used for many, seemingly unrelated things. Among those is the quick inexpensive production of drugs that were otherwise slow and expensive to produce.

Graphene is much in the news thanks to Andre Geim, who shared a Nobel Prize in 2010 for being the first to obtain and experiment with usable amounts of graphene, and who a decade earlier, in 2000, shared an Ig Nobel Prize for using magnets to levitate a frog.

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