Become a patron

AAAS Twitter discussion about Surprising Things, Monday!

Join us and some surprising people in a twitter discussion about surprising things in science.

This is part of the AAAS’s new Virtual Media initiative. The AAAS is of course the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which publishes Science magazine, organizes the AAAS Annual Meeting (at which we have done an Improbable Research show every year for the past quarter century), and does lots more.

WHENMonday, April 20, from 1pm to 3pm, US Eastern time.

WHERE: See the discussion on Twitter, at: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23aaasmtg&src=typed_query&f=live

HOW— To be part of the discussion, tweet your thoughts, on Twitter. Be sure to include the hashtag #AAASmtg in each of your tweets.

WHO— These are some of the people who will be in the discussion. You can join them:

Marc Abrahams, editor, Annals of Improbable Research, and founder of the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony. @MarcAbrahams, @ImprobResearch

Rebecca Helm, discoverer of a method to grow jellyfish in captivity. Rebecca is an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina, Asheville. @RebeccaRHelm

David Hu, double Ig Nobel Prize winner, for testing the biological principle that nearly all mammals empty their bladders in about 21 seconds (plus or minus 13 seconds), and also for studying how, and why, wombats make cube-shaped poo. David is Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biology at Georgia Tech. @drdavidhu

Patricia Yang, double Ig Nobel Prize winner, for testing the biological principle that nearly all mammals empty their bladders in about 21 seconds (plus or minus 13 seconds), and also for studying how, and why, wombats make cube-shaped poo. Patricia is a postdoc at Stanford University. @pyang_tweet

Olga Shishkov studies the collective dynamics of maggots. Olga is a doctoral student at Georgia Tech. @o_shishk

Nicole Sharp, fluid dynamicist, founder of FYFD, the world’s most popular fluid dynamics web site. Nicole is also an organizer of the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony. @aerognome, @fyfluiddynamics

Mark Dingemanse, Ig Nobel Prize winner for discovering that the word “huh?” (or its equivalent) seems to exist in every human language — and for not being completely sure why. Mark is Associate Professor in Language and Communication at Radboud University, The Netherlands. @DingemanseMark

Dany Adams studies bioelectricity and lots of other biology. She is chief scientist at Ion Dynamics. Dany is also an organizer of the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony. @datoms61

Marc-Antoine Fardin, Ig Nobel Prize winner for using fluid dynamics to probe the question “Can a Cat Be Both a Solid and a Liquid?” Marc is a physicist at Université Paris Diderot, France. @FardinMarc

We will talk about all sorts of thing, including maybe these videos:

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!