Icky Cutesy Research Review

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Icky Cutesy Research Review

Research reports that are icky and/or cutesy
Compiled by Alice Shirrell Kaswell, AIR staff

Cutesy

“The Case of the Burly Wee Man,” Archives of Environmental Health, vol. 28, no. 5, May 1974, pp. 297-8.

Cutesy

“The Nosocomial Colonization of T. Bear,” W.T. Hughes, B. Williams, B. Williams, and T. Pearson, Infection Control, vol. 7, no. 10, October 1986, pp. 495-500. (Thanks to Freidrich Topl for bringing this to our attention.) The authors explain that:

A national effort to reduce nosocomial infections includes a program developed at the National Institutes of Health to encourage handwashing in hospitals and day care centers.... One of the items used is a stuffed toy T. Bear to be dispensed to the hospitalized child. Considering the manner in which children handle stuffed toys, we suspected the T. Bear might serve as a “fomite” for transmission of nosocomial microbes. A prospective study of 39 sterilized T. Bears revealed that all became colonized with bacteria, fungi, or both within 1 week of hospitalization. Hospital acquired organisms cultured from the T. Bear included Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, alpha streptococci, Corynebacterium acnes, Micrococcus sp, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillus sp, and species of Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon, Aspergillus and others. Concomitant cultures of the patients revealed similar isolates. Although the T. Bear handwashing campaign should not be discredited, the promotional toy may pose an unnecessary expense and hazard and should not be used in hospitals or day care centers.

Icky

“The Therapeutic Value of Medical Photography,” J.D. Bennett, T.J. Woolford, and C. Lundall, Journal of Audiovisual Media in Medicine, vol. 16, no. 4, October 1993, p. 173. The authors, who are at the Manchester (UK) Royal Infirmary, explain that:

Medical photography is shown to have therapeutic value in illustrating to a patient a previously hidden clinical lesion. The sight of the extent and nature of a hole in her nasal septum which the patient had caused by picking her nose allowed her to stop this habit where previous medication and psychotherapy had failed.

Icky

“Abdominoscrotal Hydrocele Mimicking a Herniation of the Bladder,” J.F. Redman and K.A. Ick, Southern Medical Journal, vol. 94, no. 2, February 2001, pp. 235-236.

Cutesy

“The Swedish Pimple; Or, Thoughts on Specialization,” J.D. Bernhard, Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 32, no. 3, March 1995, pp. 505-9.

Intriguingly Icky

“The Cow With Zits, ” W.J. Pories, Current Surgery, vol. 58, no 1, January 2001, p. 1.

© Copyright 2003 Annals of Improbable Research (AIR)

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