Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Final of 10 parts)

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Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Final of 10 parts)

A glance at the colorful research of an under-publicized scientist

by Alice Shirrell Kaswell, with research assistance from Rachael Moeller Gorman

This page is the final part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.


Women in Vans

The year 1999 saw the first publication that mentioned Trinkaus’s eye-opening discoveries about women driving vans. This particular paper was, in other respects, a continuation of, and elaboration on, his work on stop sign dissenters.

As ever, the progression of new topics continued apace, as did the further elaboraton of many matters begun in earlier times.

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(79) “Stop Sign Dissenters: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 89, no. 3, part 2, December 1999, pp. 1193-4.

Observations were made at the same 4 T-junction intersections in a residential community in the suburbs of a large northeastern city. Two characteristics were selected for viewing: type of vehicle and sex of driver. Data for 8 90-min observations suggest an overall compliance rate of about 6% with stop signs in a residential community. Women driving vans were the least compliant--approximately 1%.

(80) “Buzzwords in Campaign 2000 as Possible Rank Index of Contemporary Social Issues: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 88, no. 2, April 2001, pp. 365-6.

(81) “Left Turning Traffic Procrastinators: Another Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 90, no. 3, part 1, June 2000, pp. 961-2.

A total of 56 1-hr observations were made. The results indicate that operators of lead vehicles moved out more slowly when someone was waiting behind them, especially women driving vans. These data confirm the results of an earlier study (J. Trinkaus, 1998).

(82) “Blocking the Box: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 89, no. 2, October 2001, pp. 315-6.

Data for 32 1-hr. observations in a residential community showed about 200 violations of a traffic regulation requiring motorists to keep intersections clear. Women driving vans were the least compliant -- accounting for approximately 40% of the total.

(83) “Diversity and the Handicapped: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 89, no. 2, October 2001, pp. 369-70.

Data for viewings of 58 television game shows suggests none of the 157 observed contestants to be physically handicapped.

(84) “Compliance With the Item Limit of the Food Supermarket Express Checkout Lane: Another Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 91, no. 3, part 2, December 2002, pp. 1057-8.

(85) “Shopping Center Fire Zone Parking Violators: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 95, no. 3, part 2, December 2002, pp. 1215-6.

Data for 33 1-hr. observations at a shopping center in a suburban location showed about 700 violations of a traffic regulation prohibiting parking in a fire zone. Women driving vans were the least compliant -- accounting for approximately 35% of the total.

(86) “Students’ Course and Faculty Evaluations: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 91, no. 3, part 2, December 2002, p. 988.

For one class, over 8 consecutive semesters, about 10% of the students completing a course and faculty evaluation form reported one or more session cancellations, while in actuality there were none.

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Into the Future

One could speculate on which new directions Trinkaus will explore, and which of his many existing interests will be given new illumination. Perhaps most intriguingly, one could wonder which of those well-studied subjects might be accorded the honor of a Final Look.

But to guess at any of these things would be pointless. If history is any guide, John Trinkaus will continue to surprise us. We can but marvel at the tenacity of his apparently boundless, and wonderfully curious, enthusiasm.

 


This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.

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