Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Part 3 of 10)

HotAIR LOGO

Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Part 3 of 10)

A glance at the colorful research of an under-publicized scientist

by Alice Shirrell Kaswell, with research assistance from Rachael Moeller Gorman

This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.


Matters of the Mall

Trinkaus’s first publication of 1984 had introduced his readers to an innovation they would come to relish. There, for the first time, the author described research he had conducted in or near a shopping mall.

Almost immediately, he extended his inquiries, while simultaneously delving further into mysteries related to parking. And he continued adding new topics to his research portfolio.

* * *

(15) “Shopping Mall Parking Violations: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 59, no. 1, August 1984, p. 30.

Studied violations of handicapped parking space at a shopping mall to determine the ratio of expensive to inexpensive vehicles in improper parking spaces. The proportion of improperly parked expensive to inexpensive cars in handicapped driver spaces was about the same as that of all conveyances using the lot. It is suggested that parking violations are more a function of prevailing cultural norms than of automobile purchase prices.

(16) “Merchandise Fads of Yesteryear: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 55, no. 2, October 1984, pp. 401-2.

Administered a questionnaire to 720 business undergraduates asking 4 questions (e.g., Do you own one?) about 14 product fads in the US, 1772 to 1975. Results show that Ss had a relatively fair recollection of the items. Of those Ss who remembered the items, only a relatively few had, or still have, ownership.

(17) “Societal Activities and the Handicapped: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 59, no. 2, October 1984, p. 526.

TV game shows broadcast in one urban area over a 6-mo period were observed to determine the number of contestants who appeared to be disabled (i.e., displaying an inability to walk or stand unaided or sight or hearing deficits).... It is suggested that the handicapped may shun such events because they have been conditioned to believe that they are unable to cope for themselves or compete with others.

(18) “A Bottle Law: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 59, no. 3, December 1984, p. 806.

Conducted observations before and after the passage of a 1983 statute that mandated the payment of a deposit of returnable soft-drink cans and bottles.... Approximately 47 bottles and cans were observed along a block-long path of a city park each day prior to the statute and approximately 2 each day 1 yr later.

(19) “Stop-Light Compliance: Another Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 59, no. 3, December 1984, p. 814.

[R]eplicat[ed] J. Trinkaus’s (1983) 45 1-hr observations of a major traffic intersection... [R]esults show that violation of stop-light compliance rose 15% since Trinkaus’s study... Possible factors contributing to increased violations are discussed.

* * *


This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.

© Copyright 2003 Annals of Improbable Research (AIR)

This is a HotAIR feature. For a complete list of features, see What's New.