Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Part 7 of 10)

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Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Part 7 of 10)

A glance at the colorful research of an under-publicized scientist

by Alice Shirrell Kaswell, with research assistance from Rachael Moeller Gorman

This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.


The Celebrated Brussels Sprouts

Late in 1991, Trinkaus caught a sizeable portion of the world’s attention with his informal look at taste preference for Brussels sprouts. His nearly simultaneous informal examination of the fruit and vegetable components of business students’ diets was rather overlooked in the hoopla.

So great and long-lasting was the glare from the Brussels sprouts, that much of the world simply did not notice Trinkaus’s equally fine work over the next several years on stop sign compliance, on commuter train line service irregularity, on a short-lived commuter parking lot crowd, and in 1993’s remarkable “Compliance With the Item Limit of the Food Supermarket Express Checkout Lane: An Informal Look.”

It was not until October, 1993 that things calmed down enough for people to see what was plain before them. It was at that point that Trinkaus served up his breakthrough paper about the behavior of people swimming laps in a pool.

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(53) “The Fruit and Vegetable Component of Students’ Diets: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 69, part 1, December 1991, pp. 844-6.

An informal inquiry of 442 business students as to their consumption of fruits and vegetables showed that, while these foods are normally consumed daily, the number of servings per day was generally less than that recommended by the US Department of Health and Human Services.

(54) “Taste Preference For Brussels Sprouts: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, K. Dennis, Psychological Reports, vol. 69, no. 3, part 2, special issue, December 1991, pp. 1165-6.

Conducted an inquiry of the taste preference of 442 baccalaureate business students for brussels sprouts. Results reveal about a 50% dislike of the vegetable, a 40% indifference, and a 10% liking.

(55) “Contrasting Departure Service of Commuter Railroad Trains: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 74, no 1, February 1992, pp. 169-70.

50 convenience observations over the course of 12 mo suggest that the quality of passenger service provided by a commuter railroad varies among train lines.

(56) “Perceptions About the Constitutionality of Health Care: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 75, no. 3, part 2, December 1992, pp. 1193-4.

(57) “Some Students’ Perceptions About AIDS: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 75, no. 3, part 2, December 1992, pp. 1344-6.

(58) “Stop Sign Compliance: A Follow-Up Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 76, no. 3, part 2, June 1993, p. 1218.

Analysis of 324 observations at an intersection previously studied by J. Trinkaus (1988) showed a continuing decrease in full stops with increased rolling and no stops...

(59) “Compliance With the Item Limit of the Food Supermarket Express Checkout Lane: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 73, no. 1, August 1993, p. 105-6.

75 15-min observations of customers’ behavior at a food supermarket showed that only about 15% of shoppers observed the item limit of the express lane.... Results indicate a tendency not to play by the rules in the absence of meaningful real or imagined constraints.

(60) “An Informal Look at a Short-Lived Commuter Parking Lot Crowd,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 77, no. 2, October 1993, pp. 449-50.

Daily observations traced informal commuter action in using a newly cleared unposted field for station parking. During approximately 10 wks from the time the space became available until it was closed off (by fencing) a number of conventional characteristics of crowd behavior were evidenced.

(61) “Swimming Laps: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 73, no. 2, October 1993, pp. 665-6.

An informal inquiry consisting of 105 observations suggests that, when given a choice, most swimmers opted to swim laps in shallow rather than deep water.

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This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.

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