Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Part 8 of 10)

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Trinkaus -- An Informal Look (Part 8 of 10)

A glance at the colorful research of an under-publicized scientist

by Alice Shirrell Kaswell, with research assistance from Rachael Moeller Gorman

This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.


Caps, Chapel Attendance, and Perceptions of Ground Beef

The years 1994 and 1995 were an especially fruitful period for Trinkaus. His April, 1994 paper on baseball-type caps brought him recognition of unprecedented reach and scope. And that was just the beginning. Many of the topics on which he published during this golden period -- including several entirely new ones -- are of interest to specialists and generalists alike.

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(62) “Wearing Baseball-Type Caps: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 74, no. 2, April 1994, pp. 585-6.

Observed 407 people wearing baseball-type caps with the peak in back in the downtown area and on 2 college campuses (1 in an inner borough and 1 in an outer borough) of a large city. About 40% of Ss in the downtown area and at the inner-borough college wore the cap with the peak to the rear, while about 10% of the outer-borough college Ss had the peak to the rear.

(63) “Television Station Weather-Persons’ Winter Storm Predictions: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 79, no. 1, part 1, August 1994, pp. 65-6.

(64) “Cable Television Home-Shopping Stations and Disabled Persons: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 79, no. 1, part 1, August 1994, pp. 185-6.

(65) “Cutting Corners: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 79, no. 3, part 1, December 1994, pp. 1089-90.

Presents data demonstrating that motorists are increasingly violating traffic laws by cutting through store parking areas to avoid stop signals and bypass slow-moving traffic. An informal inquiry at 2 heavily trafficked intersections suggested a rate of occurrence that ranged from about 2 per hour to approximately 1 every 2 hrs.

(66) “Drop-In Chapel Attendance: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Psychological Reports, vol. 75, no. 3, part 1, December 1994, pp. 1193-4.

(67) “Some Perceptions of Shoppers About Uncooked Ground Beef: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 81, no. 1, August 1995, pp. 32-4.

An informal poll of 100 shoppers suggested that the freshness of hamburger meat is judged by its color.... Six telephone inquiries made to the United States Department of Agriculture revealed that oxygenation led to color changes in still consumable beef.

(68) “Compliance With a School Zone Speed Limit: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 82, no. 2, April 1996, pp. 433-4.

Observance of 2,105 vehicles passing a suburban elementary school showed that about 90% were exceeding the posted speed limit. This finding lends support to the conventional wisdom that motorists’ compliance with traffic regulations is relatively low.

(69) “Wearing Baseball-Type Caps: Another Look,” J. Trinkaus and Maria Divino, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 82, no. 3, Part 1, June 1996, p. 754.

Another look on two college campuses at the practice of wearing baseball-type caps with the peak in the back showed a decline in the inner city school and an increase in the suburban school.

(70) “Delays in Clearing the Self-Service Store Check-Out Counter: An Informal Look,” John Trinkaus and Maria Divino, Psychological Reports, vol. 80, no. 2, April 1997, pp. 508-10.

(71) “The Demise of ‘Yes’: An Informal Look,” J. Trinkaus, Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 84, no. 3, part 1, June 1997, p. 866.

For affirmative responses to simple interrogatories, the use of ”absolutely” and ”exactly” may be becoming more socially frequent than ”yes.” A counting of positive replies to 419 questions on several TV networks showed 249 answers of ”absolutely,” 117 ”exactly,” and 53 of ”yes.”

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This page is but one part of a 10-part series. Click here to see the introduction and index of the article, with links to all the parts.

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