Archive for 'Improbable Sex'

Using Smartphone Apps to Find Sexual Partners [research study]

Wednesday, August 8th, 2018

How to use smartphones to pick up sex partners is a problem that’s been studied by scholars. Now, three other scholars have studied those studies. Here’s what they say they found:

Using Smartphone Apps to Find Sexual Partners: A Review of the Literature,” A. Anzani, M. Di Sarno, and A. Prunas [pictured here], Sexologies, vol. 27, no. 3, July–September 2018, pp. e61-e65.

The authors, at the University of Milan-Bicocca, Italy, explain:

The current paper aims to offer an overview of recent research on mobile dating apps as a way to find sexual partners… The average app user profile is that of a white man having sex with men (MSM), between 25 and 35 years of age, with high education and income, who has a large number of sexual encounters and often engages in risky behavior (e.g., unprotected anal intercourse, drug or alcohol use during sex). Studies in the field suffer from several limitations, including a… paucity of studies on the positive sexual and relational outcomes of app use; finally, few studies explored app use in the LGBTQIA population as a whole, in addition to heterosexuals….

Finally, the large majority of studies were conducted in the United States, Australia or Asia, and there is still a lack of data from European countries.

Non-Word and Word Noises During Sex [research study]

Tuesday, July 17th, 2018

An Examination of Predictors of Nonverbal and Verbal Communication of Pleasure During Sex and Sexual Satisfaction,” Elizabeth A. Babin, Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, vol. 30, no. 3 2013, pp. 270-292. (Thanks to Ig Nobel Prize winner Geoffrey Miller for bringing these to our attention.) The author, at Cleveland State University, reports:

“Verbal communication during sex did not predict sexual satisfaction. The findings draw attention to the need for scholars to examine both verbal and nonverbal forms of sexual communication, as well as factors that might influence the extent to which individuals communicate sexual pleasure during sexual encounters…. The original scale reported in Brogan et al. (2009) asked participants to report on their partner’s communication during sex. To fit the needs of this study, the SCSS [Sexual Communication Style Scale] was adapted to measure participants’ own communication during sex.”

Read that and more, in the column “Improbable Sex” [free, downloadable PDF], in the special NOISE issue of the Annals of Improbable Research.

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Drug-Associated Spontaneous Orgasm (DASO): Problem, or Opportunity?

Monday, December 18th, 2017

Pharmaceutical companies might experience spontaneous fiscal arousal upon reading a new medical study about drugs that may cause spontaneous orgasms. The study is:

Drug-Associated Spontaneous Orgasm: A Case Report and Systematic Review of Literature,” Wei-Hsi Chen, Yuan-Hsiang Chu, and Kuo-Yen Chen, Clinical Neuropharmacology, epub 2017. The authors, at Shu-Te University and Chang Gung University, Taiwan, explain:

We report a male patient of repetitive spontaneous orgasm under trazodone treatment and systematically review the literature on drug-associated spontaneous orgasm (DASO)…. A total of 25 patients (18 women and 7 men), including our reported case, experienced 27 DASO events…. A reduction of dose or discontinuation of the offending drug usually abolished DASO….

Sex and age seem to have no influence on occurrence of DASO events….

Index drugs induced SPONO [spontaneous orgasm] but did not change the quality of the classical orgasm….

There is an equal likelihood that SPONO will occur within 7 days or between 8 days and 1 month after drug use regardless of drug type. An immediate reaction following drug administration is rare.

Smart investors can be on the listen for mention of the suddenly-chic phrases “DASO” and “SPONO”, at cocktail parties where pharma executives roam.

Marc Gozlan wrote an appreciation of this new research, in the Réalités Biomédicales blog in Le Monde: “Ces médicaments qui déclenchent des orgasmes spontanés.”

Forensic Comparison: Sex With Animals vs Human-Butt-Fisting

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

The traditional method of literary analysis known as “Compare and Contrast” gets a workout in this newly published medical study:

Similar mechanisms of traumatic rectal injuries in patients who had anal sex with animals to those who were butt-fisted by human sexual partner,” Damian Jacob Sendler, Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, vol. 51, 2017, 69e73.

The author, at the University of Lublin Medical School, Lublin, Poland, reports;

“Among zoophiles, the mode of harm occurs through blood-engorged, interlocked penis that causes tissue lacerations upon retraction from an anus. In people experimenting with fisting, repetitive stretching within anal canal and of external sphincter causes the internal injuries. The mode of physical stimulation explains the extent of injuries in fisters vs. zoophiles: in fisting, the pressure applied by hand is controllable proximally around and within anal sphincter, while penetration by the animal penis is unpredictable and occurs within the proximal anal canal. Forensically, the findings presented in this article describe a significant mechanism of injury in fisters versus passive zoophiles. These descriptions may aid in clinically differentiating pleasurable and pathological rectal stimulation.”

Here’s additional detail from the study:

(Thanks to Ivan Oransky for bringing this to our attention.)

The Effect of Sex on Heart Rate Variability at High Altitude [research study]

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

The word “sex” can to refer to gender, rather than sexual activity. Perhaps disappointingly, that seems to be the case in this medical study:

The Effect of Sex on Heart Rate Variability at High Altitude,” Christopher John Boos [pictured here], Emma Vincent, Adrian Mellor, John O’Hara, Caroline Newman, Richard Cruttenden, Phylip Scott, Mark Cooke, Jamie Matu, and David Richard Woods, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, epub July 20, 2017.

The authors, at Poole Hospital NHS Foundation trust, Poole; Bournemouth University, Bournemouth; Leeds Beckett University; Defence Medical Services, Lichfield; James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough; Wansbeck General and Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle; and University of Newcastle; all in the UK, report (we added the bolding emphasis):

There is evidence to suggest that high altitude (HA) exposure leads to a fall in heart rate variability (HRV) that is linked to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). The effects of sex on changes in HRV at HA and its relationship to AMS are unknown.

METHODS: HRV (5-minute single lead ECG) was measured in 63 healthy adults (41 men and 22 women) aged 18-56 years at sea level (SL) and during a HA trek at 3619m, 4600m and 5140m respectively. The main effects of altitude (SL, 3619, 4600 and 5140m) and sex (men vs women) and their potential interaction were assessed…

This particular paper is distinguished by the advanced quality of the writing. The wording at the end of the paper’s abstract is so very concise that it approaches being poetry:

Conclusions: Increasing HA leads to a reduction in HRV. Significant differences between men and women emerge at HA. HRV was not predictive of AMS.

(Thanks to Adrian Smith for bringing this to our attention.)

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